Welcome to ASTC's Online Bookstore!





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Co-produced by ASTC and the Association of Children's Museums (ACM), this report is based on a survey of 155 US institutions and features detailed data on 14 positions, including salaries analyzed by museum size, educational requirements, benefits provided, and turnover rates. Salary information for 10 additional positions, plus information from CEOs at 25 institutions outside the US are included. PDF format only. 308 pp. #103-2011 FREE for members that contributed data to this report.
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Based primarily on data reported in late 2011 and early 2012 by science centers and museums around the world, this electronic report includes a full-color summary document, graphs in individual files suitable for dropping into digital presentations, and over 40 tables of information on facilities, programs, attendance, membership, employees and volunteers, and finances. Do you work for a member of ASTC? Email ASTC's publications department for your free copy! P
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Based primarily on data reported in late 2012 and early 2013 by science centers and museums around the world, this electronic report includes a full-color summary document, graphs suitable for dropping into digital presentations, and over 70 tables and graphs of information on facilities, programs, attendance, membership, employees and volunteers, and finances. Do you work for a member of ASTC? Email ASTC's publications department for your free copy! PDF only.
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An ASTC Bulletin that provides guidelines for designing a science center, including ceiling heights, floor loads, lighting systems, electricity, and more. Ten case studies show how the guidelines work in the real world of science-center construction. Charles Howarth Jr. and Maeryta Medrano; ASTC, 1997. 55 pp. #110
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Whether starting a new science center or expanding an existing one, a sound business plan is vital to success. This ASTC Bulletin describes why and how to create one and includes a sample plan. Charles H. Trautmann; ASTC, 1997. Available in photocopy only. 26 pp. #111
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Shrink-wrapped and hole-punched to fit into a three-ring binder, this collection of inexpensive exhibit ideas is perfect for small museums and exhibit developers on a tight budget. The book provides construction tips and exhibit schematics. Exhibits include the weight changer, liquid crystal walls, Moebius zippers, and more. Paul Orselli; ASTC, 1995. 69 pp. #89
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Thirty more cheap exhibit ideas, still shrink-wrapped and hole-punched to fit into a three-ring binder. This edition includes, among others, Pyramid Puzzle by Dan Goldwater, Howling Cats by Stephen Pizzey, and Magnetic Canvas by Chris Burda. Paul Orselli; ASTC, 1999. 49 pp. #125
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Another 31 cheap exhibit ideas, shrink-wrapped and hole-punched to fit into a three-ring binder. Featured in Volume 3 are Harvey the Invisible Rabbit by Harry White, Little from the Big by Pietro Cerreta, Parabolic Throw by Geoff Snowdon, and Cartesian Floater by Al Read. Paul Orselli; ASTC, 2004. 68 pp. #150
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These three collections of inexpensive exhibit ideas, shrink-wrapped and hole-punched to fit into a threering binder, have been extremely popular. Perfect for small museums and exhibit developers on a budget, each volume provides construction tips and exhibit schematics for 30 time-tested interactive exhibits. We are now selling these together for a discount, so buy all three for a special price today! #169
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This publication is a must for museums engaged in or considering collaboration. The result of a seven-month 1995 study involving four focus groups and 23 in-depth interviews with professionals from science centers at all stages of development, the book provides seven assessment criteria for choosing a project and 12 keys to successful collaboration. Pacific Science Center and SLi, 1997. 69 pp. #106
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This report by the Issues Laboratory Collaborative reveals that the public wants to see controversial exhibits, as long as the museum shows both sides of the issue. Communicating Controversy indicates how museums can examine controversial issues without themselves becoming the focus of the controversy. Issues Laboratory Collaborative, 1995. 36 pp. #83
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TWO GREAT BOOKS, ONE GREAT PRICE! Package of The Convivial Museum and the companion volume, Visitor Voices in Museum Exhibitions, at a discounted price. #159
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In a time of challenge, what can museum professionals do to assure that museums continue to fulfill their promise as essential public institutions? This richly illustrated book offers reflections about key dimensions of a defining quality of vibrant public places, which the authors call "conviviality"—a welcoming spirit, orientation to the community, comfort, opportunities for social engagement, and places for healing and renewal. Kathleen McLean and Wendy Pollock; ASTC, 2011. 200 pp. #158
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The Science Museum of Minnesota's Experiment Gallery has been praised for giving visitors more control over exhibits. Several people can sit at each of the gallery's benches and select from an assortment of experiments. Experiment Bench describes 10 benches, including components, construction diagrams, suppliers, and text. The book also contains critiques of each exhibit and suggestions for improving them. Colleen M. Sauber, editor; Science Museum of Minnesota, 1994. 215 pp. #78
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Limited stock — order now! H. Richard Crane; Ann Arbor Hands•On Museum, 1992. 106 pp. #60
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This book looks at family groups in four science museums. It summarizes the results of a four-year NSF-funded R & D project—defining and measuring family learning, determining exhibit characteristics that facilitate active family learning, and developing exhibit components that embody these characteristics and measure their impact. Minda Borun, et al; Philadelphia/Camden Informal Science Education Collaborative, 1998. Available in pdf format only. 70 pp. #121
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A must for exhibit developers, researchers, educators, and other museum professionals looking for ways to engage visitors more deeply with interactive science exhibits, this book documents the exploration and findings of the Exploratorium's APE project. Thomas Humphrey, Joshua P. Gutwill, and the Exploratorium APE Team; Exploratorium, 2005. 144 pp. #205
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This book is an important tool for employees and managers who want to communicate more effectively. The Four Conversations: Daily Communication that Gets Results shows some of the mistakes that are made in everyday conversation and provides the reader with the tools how to minimize those mistakes and to communicate in a way that is productive both for themselves and their colleagues. Jeffrey Ford and Laurie Ford; Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2009. 240 pp. #166
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The result of a four-year collaboration between the Franklin Institute and the Girl Scouts, this guide features tested programs and ready-to-use materials on six basic science themes for two groups: girls aged 5-10 and girls aged 11-14. Museums are using the curriculum in their scout programs and with homeschoolers and families to cultivate intergenerational learning and interaction. Dale McCreedy and Tobi Zemsky; The Franklin Institute/Girl Scouts of the U.S.A., 2002. 226 pp. #145
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In Their Own Voices is the story of thirteen families from the African American, Latino, and Asian communities in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Camden, New Jersey, who have been actively involved in grant-funded outreach programs for nearly two decades. The collection is a surprisingly candid and moving portrait of the significant role that these programs can play in the lives of local families. Minda Borun, et al., The Franklin Institute, 2011. 70 pp. #160
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Limited stock — order now! An Invisible Infrastructure: Institutions of Informal Science Education Inverness Research Associates, 1996; Volume 1: Findings (20 pp.); Volume 2: Statistics (126 pp.); Sold as set only. #97/98
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Drawing on the Science Museum of Minnesota's experiences with its Experiment Gallery activity station, Jane Snell Copes has put together this compilation of proven, hands-on science activities designed for museums. The book is indispensable for its tips on interacting with visitors, building sturdy equipment, locating suppliers for consumables, and keeping activities safe. Jane Snell Copes; Science Museum of Minnesota, 1997. 173 pp. #107
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With the first wave of baby boomers now looking to the next phase of life, the time is right for museums to expand their engagement with older adult audiences. This publication offers positive examples, inspirational stories, and resources for those who are ready to get involved. Wendy Pollock, Editor; ASTC, 2009. 55 pp. #154
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Math Momentum in Science Centers is the final product of a three-year, NSF-funded initiative led by TERC in partnership with ASTC. The book is based on the experiences of 13 U.S. science centers and aquariums that took on the challenge of making mathematics not only more visible in their institutions, but also more engaging, inquiry-based, and broadly accessible. Jan Mokros, et al.; TERC, 2006. 168 pp. #151
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Limited stock — order now! Melanie L. Herman and Peggy M. Jackson; Nonprofit Risk Management Center, 2001. 96 pp. #20